Monday, January 16, 2012

The Right to Crowdsourcing... Governments

Governments have to start crowdsourcing
before they do some of the things they do.
Making decisions with an elite group of people in a closed office
breeds poorly made ideas, with mistakes then paid for by citizens' taxes.

Case in point.
The new Martin Luther King, Jr. monument in Washington, D.C.
has a line chiseled in stone that many critics dislike, and
so now, it will be changed, at a cost.
The inscription is: "I was a drum major for justice, peace and righteousness,"
which paraphrases his real 1968 speech quote:
"Yes, if you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice. Say that I was a drum major for peace. I was a drum major for righteousness. And all of the other shallow things will not matter."
The memorial's Council of Historians shortened it for space,
but it's really not the same.

Martin Luther King monument inaugurated in fall, 2011.

Couldn't this Council of Historians have crowdsourced the public for
'best short Martin Luther King quotes'
before chiseling into stone?

And while they were at it, couldn't they have also crowdsourced for the
 'best of King's body stances'?  What's with this body language?
The folded arms is body language for closed and protective,
while King is known for his open love of all humanity.

Crowdsourcing may cost to implement,
but the results are 'monumental.'



23 comments:

Anonymous said...

Definitely, his words were taken out of context and do not have the same meaning, nor do they convey the same message.

I view his pose from a different perspective. Strong, tall and proud, will not be backed down.

BRM

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing is a magnificent process; we are a melting pot of thoughts and perspectives, so this option makes sense. What one group perceives as accurate, the other may perceive it as inaccurate. The U.S. is diversity and difference, each one of us an independent thought and idea. Had we been able to give feedback, I am sure we would have chiseled the accurate words in stone.

Our country’s views on civil rights were impacted because of Dr. King’s vision and passionate words, “…And all of the other shallow things will not matter." With all of the modern technology we have today, the blogs, social media, television, and so on, how costly would it really be to ask for feedback? My right to have a voice and have different ideas is because I live in the real world. I relate to real people that have real struggles and scars to show where they have been. Don’t represent me without my consent and expect me to pay for it later. Ask me my opinion, and I will provide you with my truth and believe me I will save you money because I will also ask others for theirs. T.L.

Anonymous said...

Martin Luther King Jr.true leader in America, his teachings should be remembered for all generations to come. It is important to keep the exact words and phrases he used. If we don't do that, we open a frame for misunderstanding of what he was trying to said, and the more harmed will be the future generations who wont understand who Martin Luther King Jr. Really was.
ASR.

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing might ensure that most voices are heard, however, this is impractical in every situation as some things might never be done. I doubt an entire nation could come to consensus in how MLK's statue should stand, or which of his quotes should be cast in stone. Although crowdsourcing is positive, it is a utopian concept, that I believe our overpopulated Earth will never master. ALB

RCW said...

This is quite interesting. Just like Government Transparency in including citizens on governemnt events and oter politics, Citizens should also be included in on these sort of decisions. We the public should have a say on what we present in our country and how we present it, because we are the majority amongst the politicians, and we are the face when other countries look at us.

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing is a great way to bring minds together, in order to solve, or give opinions about a particular subject. Not many countries are able to have this privilege, but in the U.S.A. Crowdsourcing, in my opinion, should be a popular and effective way of making certain decisions.
AG

Anonymous said...

I agree with the right to crowdsourcing... government and with the first commenter, BRM. Martin Luther King was a great man how was unlawfully murdered by a citizen of the United States. If our government decided to honor his now, they should have the decency to engrave the whole quote and not just whatever’s convenient to them. When I first saw the picture on the post, I thought the stone was plastic. And I can agree with the post about his stance, the King was an open and peace oriented man, he looks a bit closed off and negative in the picture.
M.D.L.

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing helps bring the people together and gives people the opportunity to have the opinion noticed. It also makes our society a much happier and satisfied society. We do not have to argue that our government took the liberty to put their own opinion without letting our society choose.
ABL

Anonymous said...

Crowd-sourcing would be a logical thing to do when deciding the wording to describe such an icon as the late Dr. Martin Luther King. Unfortunately, those with the position and authority to make that decision don't always agree. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., died in 1968 trying to change the thinking of the world. We owe it to his living memory to correct the wording.

In reference to the position of his effigy it conveyed to me strength, power, confidence and determination. -YEM

Anonymous said...

I love bringing controversy. Crowdsourcing is a great idea to many decision making processes, especially those actions with a high society’s involvement, like the development of buildings, streets, highways, monuments, among other. However, from the business point of view, many companies will stay away crowdsourcing to avoid copy rights or providing ideas to competitors.
As far as the monument itself, to me it brings a sense of respect, a statue of courage, an illustration of Dr. King’s will to stand talk and firm behind his beliefs.

*NG*

Anonymous said...

I do believe that they could of picked a better pose for Martin Luther king. He was known for his openness and community involvement and of course guiding the United states into a new era. His word I think we're choosen very well thou and I do like that saying. Jpg

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing is an excellent tool to motivate individuals for self and its society’s improvement. The issue with the same is the inability to come up with concrete answers that satisfy all those involved.
In regards of the monument, it is much Americanized. In the U.S. it is customary to promote statues with a strong sense of character and should not be messed with; unfortunately in this one, a real image Martin Luther King Jr. was not captured, a man who fought violence with kindness.

AYS

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing is an excellent tool to motivate individuals for self and its society’s improvement. The issue with the same is the inability to come up with concrete answers that satisfy all those involved.
In regards of the monument, it is much Americanized. In the U.S. it is customary to promote statues with a strong sense of character and should not be messed with; unfortunately in this one, a real image of Martin Luther King Jr. was not captured, a man who fought violence with kindness.

AYS

Anonymous said...

I agree that crowdsourcing would help in making key decisions about projects, especially if we the people are to pay it, and any mistakes made in the process. It really would not be that expensive to ask the public for insight. On the internet, we are flooded with polls and questioner's about what silly celebrities wear and what politician you might vote for, so why not ask the public for input on national monuments? I feel that the position they chose for him usually is viewed as being standoffish but, it is also a stance that says "I'm not going anywhere". Whatever the designers do now, I hope they get it right.
G.C.

Mr.Drama said...

Dr. Martin Luther king Jr, an excellent iconic figure for the civil rights movement, aswell as a promoter for Racial equality. His opposition for injustice is greatly exemplefied throught the process of his boycotts for peace. It is a shame to see that our own government has paraphased the words of, if not the speaker of our time. The peoples needs Must be recognized and shouldnt be discussed upon the matters of our political society, in other words crowdsourcing should have been the option for this matter.

RAH

Anonymous said...

The government should include larger more diverse groups of people when deciding some of the things they do. Opportunity for all citizens to submit their opinion is necessary to find the closest to correct one. I do agree it seems his words were not fully respected because it was shortened. However, isn’t the important thing that his message came across? It is all about perception! I understand King was famous for his “open love of all humanity”, but the folded arms could be a symbol of his great strength and persistent for what he believed in.
LINA.A

Fidela said...

I accept that crowdsourcing is absolutely essential to solve complex problems with the participation of many individuals with different ideas. However, to use the crowdsourcing method for this particular paraphrasing error, it should not be applied. I cannot believe that the elite group of people assigned for this task did not know the difference between quoting and paraphrasing? Did the Council of Historians failed to have a plan becoming so imperative to shorten his quote for space? Where they trying to paraphrase in order to save some money in a monumental sculpture that cost more than $120 million dollars? They just need it to quote-as is. Furthermore,due to this controversial drum major quote, the Secretary of Department of Interior, Ken Salazar, is recommending to consult with the King's family members for their decision. Were they asked before?

My interpretation of his posture, I have a different connotation for closed and protective: I will be firm, and I will be protective of humanity.
Fidela

Anonymous said...

The government's actions were most definitely not done with bad intentions. They should not assume that everyone will agree with what they decide. WE the people need to make decisions together.
J.R.

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing shouldn't even be an option, it should be the RIGHT thing to do . Any actions or major roles should involve a little of crowdsourcing . How can such mistake be made by so called elite minds? If so elite they should have known better.
A.Q

Bruna said...

In my opinion, body Language is not entirely important in this case. The main idea of the monument, that it is the memory and image of a great man is what should be noticed. The American people already have a fairly fixed image of this great leader, and whether or not his arms are crossed does not really make much difference. When people erect a monument to a leader, there will always be people in opposition as to the finished work. It is easy to be a critic. You cannot please everyone all the time. As for the quote, I think it is okay to paraphrase, as long as the original idea is intact.

SKT said...

When you try to quote somebody and try to make other people remember what a great person somebody was; the exact words and a revised version of their words are going to have a totally different impact on a person. As Dr. King is an inspiration to many, and a role model to much more. A lot of men look up to Dr.King and say "I want to have an impact on my country as you did." Those who know his speech from left to right and take his speech to heart are going to be infuriated about the revised version of a part in his speech. It doesn't have the same meaning and especially putting it on a monument of one of the most influential people of our time.

Anonymous said...

Crowdsourcing could be a powerful tool for businesses to grow without spending to much money.Crowdsourcing can become a great tool in society if everyone participates. I think it can be used to better our society and help find solutions to a lot of our problems weather it is a political problem, an economic problem, or a medical problem.
S.A.

Anonymous said...

I agree the monument was poorly thought out, but the group of people who originally planned it should not be blamed. I am sure some type of system was in place to come to that decision and they must have a valid reason for it.
CP