Friday, May 6, 2011

The Right to Compassion... Bin Laden Death Photos

The Right to Compassion
is about alleviating pain and suffering,
by giving and receiving compassion,
to and from other people and oneself.


The Right to Compassion aids any decision-making process.
We simply ask, What is the choice here that reduces suffering and pain?

As a visual-oriented species,
human beings are frustrated when not able to see something we are so curious to see.
But a dead person with head and chest torn open by bullet wounds is a violent vision.
The choice to not present the Bin Laden photos publicly  prevents pain.
It is a choice of compassion.

Think of the children,
exposed to such vision,
including innocent children of the deceased.
(Note: 9-11 family survivors have said that seeing this photo
would not alleviate their pain.)

I declare the Right to Compassion. 

43 comments:

shishiwaldorf said...

You're so right. If it doesn't alleviate pain, then why publish it?
Please check out my latest post and leave a comment, it's a very important thing to me!

xoxo
http://shishiwaldorf.blogspot.com/

Anonymous said...

I agree that the photos should not be published because it could bring an emotional response that could have painful and dangerous repercussions. Causing pain to others achieves nothing.
Chelsea

Anonymous said...

I believe that every person has the right to compassion, no matter who it is. If the White House would of leaked the Bin Laden photos all over the world, that would not have brought life to the victims of 9/11 nor to their families. Compassion should be positive not negative.----Lauren Franco

Anonymous said...

Yes I agree that there should be compassion amongst one another. How ever it is not always easy to please everyone. Some people may think that it is harmful and will not help them heal, while others need it for closure! Who is right? I can tell you I have zero compassion for that man and feel his rights are no longer valid but for those that he killed and for their families what is the right answer???

Sarah M

Anonymous said...

I agree with Sarah in the sense of having no compassion for Bin Laden. As for hiding the photos from innocent eyes, i say look away!

Stefan H.

Anonymous said...

I don't think it's a matter of compassion, but a matter of proof. I believe that it is important to provide the public with proof that Bin Laden is in fact deceased. Now a days it is so common for hoaxes to take place, even involving the government, therefore the public has a right to be skeptical.

LC

Anonymous said...

I honestly think a man who has killed thousands of innocent people shouldn't be treated so lightly. The photos should be able to be viewed as proof of his death, and if people with a faint of heart can't bear it, then they don't have to see it. Some people would agree that they would like to see the death of the person who killed their loved one.

Alli Brecht.

Anonymous said...

Although Bin Laden did many horrible things, what would showing the photos of his death truly accomplish? If the families of 9/11 casualties will not receive solace from such a heinous display of proof, then who are we to demand it. We have despised this individual for his inability to show compassion, and once he is out of the picture, many of us relinquish our right to compassion as well. The right to compassion is not Bin Laden's, but ours.

Sheeda M.

Anonymous said...

I have to say that I agree with Sheeda M. My family has personally been affected by the events of Sept. 11 and the war that has been brought on. It is those that are directly affected that need the compassion, not him. I feel that instead of the government handing over such violent pictures to the media, they should focus on bring our troops home safely.
Ma Mo

Anonymous said...

I agree with Sarah, who are we to determine what brings closure to those families that were affected by Bin Laden’s actions? I still think about those people who were just trying to have another day at work and end up getting killed in the most horrible way possible and my heart breaks in pieces. I feel compassion for the victims, for their families and friends, for those that experienced the tragedy closely, but there is not one drop of compassion in me for the people responsible for what happened on 911.

D.C.R

Anonymous said...

If we talk about the right to compassion we should be compassionate even about Bin Laden. He deserved to be killed because all attacks he perpetrated around the world but he and all his followers have to be hiding from justice and living under their own fear for the rest of their life.
AL

Anonymous said...

On the subject of compassion, a person as heartless, inhuman and evil as he was, is logically undeserving of any shred of compassion whatsoever. As far as the photos and visual alleviation, if the families of the victims of such a heinous act of violence wish NOT to see the moments their tormentor meets his end, then it should be respected; compassion for their feelings is the foremost important issue.

MCL

Anonymous said...

I believe every person has to the right to be compassionate. I believe whether they posted up the pictures or not it would have not have satisfied everyone. If they were to post up the pictures the 9.11 victims would not come alive again and some would complain about how vulgar it can be, and now that it is not posted some claim that Bin Laden is not really dead. I think the president is doing what he is doing for a reason and for our country. Although sometimes we might disagree with him at the end he is our leader. Compassionate-- Bin Laden should have been killed due to all the harmfulness he caused to us americans and im sure it has relived some soldiers, and families and friends of 9-11 victims.

-K.Gar

Anonymous said...

I agree to this right of compassion, not for Bin Laden but for the families of all the victims. My family is personally affected by the events of 9/11 and the war after. The photos do not alleviate pain, nor do they encourage peace. They instead portray hatred and war. I think that the world should stop worrying about photos of death being aired on the media, and should be focused on what we can do to bring the many troops overseas home safely.
Ma Mo

Alexis Herrero said...

I agree with not displaying Bin Laden death photos because not only is it morally wrong, but the disrespect of a human being and his culture. As americans we thrive on what it morally acceptable, and if president obama were to publicly show these photos, not only will the united states look immoral but declaring unnecessary war.

emilport74 said...

Revenge will never lead us to anything positive. It carries intense pain and make us act in crazy ways. There is no negative feeling that give us peace, only negative energy that always comes back to hit us like a boomerang. We need to place love where hate and vengeance can be. Love can only give us the will of endless forgiveness.

Emilio P.

Anonymous said...

I completely agree with Emilio.If people could learn to forgive, as hard as the notion may seem, then they can finally begin to move on. It takes more effort to hate and feel vengeful than to forgive and reap the benefits. Showing images of his death repeatedly through all types of media sources will only bring back memories of pain and suffering to many Americans. -K.A.S

Anonymous said...

Everyone has a right to compassion but we need to ask ourselves did Bin Laden have compassion for the people that he brutally killed? No he didn’t have compassion for the children that were left orphaned and the spouses that were left alone to take care of their children with no support. I think it’s important to post the picture on the web it should be our choice to see those pictures if we wish to.
Angel M

Anonymous said...

People have the choice to look at photos or images. No one is forcing them to see them. It’s okay to have the knowledge of what’s going on in the world but, It’s a matter of fact of what’s comfortable for you to see or not. It’s basically an individual’s decision.


-M.Quintanilla

Anonymous said...

I wouldnt understand why any of us should rejoice at the corps of a man. And for what purposes should one do so? Does it trully satisfy the thirst for vengance, to see the mangled body of a criminal over the blog sites and media? Are we any better then they? The bible refrences in Proverbs 24:17, "Do not gloat when your enemy falls;
when they stumble, do not let your heart rejoice,
18 or the LORD will see and disapprove
and turn his wrath away from them." furthermore whatelse is there to do when the book of knowledge has explained it to you.

F.H

Anonymous said...

We have to think that Bin-Laden being the horrible person he was, he was still a human being and showing his picture is a violation of human rights. He might not have cared about that when he ordered the acts he did but showing his picture shows that we are not that different.

Carlos G.

Anonymous said...

We all should put into practice compassion if we all want to live in a better world. It may sound tricky but its no impossible. Being giving and showing compassion is a good start towards making the world a better place. I know that while this man was alive he did not show compassion for all the people that were killed on 911 but if we want this world to be better, why should we be as heartlessness as he was?
LCL)

Anonymous said...

Compassion relieves us from pain and suffering. Seeing a picture of a person that has suffered and died in pain does not let us receive compassion.-ABL

Anonymous said...

I completely agree. It's funny because naturally, as humans, we feel that we need to see something in order to believe it. If that gruesome picture was publicized, and we all saw it, would we finally feel like justice was served? Would that really make us feel any better? I think that if we all practiced the right to compassion, then perhaps we could possibly live in a better world.

N.Av

Anonymous said...

Many people are not satisfied with bin laden's death, but truly revenge has been proven time and time again that it is not the best way to alleviate your pain and suffering. The world will always be involved in chaos and war, there is no such thing as passion between "The People" only when a warrior of peace rises up to travel the world and solve the issues of hatred, only then will we attain peace and compassion. But as long as there is war in this world there will always be hatred and hatred creates avengers and the cycle of death will be held up in honor in the face of these avengers again. Compassion will never be attained in this world it will just rot away with any thoughts of peace as long as there is war this will always stay as fact.
- J.J.V.

Anonymous said...

The realities of war are painful. Sheltering the public from these images only hides that reality. Out of sight, out of mind as they say.

War is not like the action movies or video games that often portray it. Showing the true brutality of war may make the American people, as a whole, less willing to wage it unnecessarily and, in turn, more compassionate for its unintended victims.

-Dan M.

L.M.L. said...

I agree with the right of compassion, feeling consideration for people's feelings is something everybody should think about before doing any harm.
When it comes to exposing Bin Laden's pictures, I agree with the government completely. We cannot forget that, as evil as he was, he did have a family and there are people who are suffering his death, and exposing those pictures will only hurt them more.

Anonymous said...

I personally think that this entire theme about Bin Laden's death is something bad at the end. The reason that they did such thing is just because revenge, and in my personal opinion revenge is not something good at all. Killing that man will never bring back the family members lost, neither will make the pain go away, and neither would make someone fell better about their lost. I believe in karma, so maybe, if he really did what he did, life was going to charge him a price much more higher than the one he paid. What you make its what you get, and soon or late it will go back to you.

H.D.A

Anonymous said...

I agree I believe people should have the right to compassion. We, the united states of America will never move forward if we continue to be revengeful and disrespect other countries. Our citizens within the states have suffered enough and by showing those photos we are reminded of the tragic events that occured on 9/11.
CR

Anonymous said...

I believe that we should either declare the right to compassion for all people or acknowledge that there are ways that people can negate their own right to compassion through their actions. No one would deny that Bin Laden has done horrible things in his life, but we are all guilty of being cruel sometimes. Do any of us really deserve compassion? If the answer is yes, where do we draw the line?
-A.B.

Anonymous said...

I also declare the right to compassion because as the saying goes, "Curiosity killed the cat." Just because some of us are curious about the Bin Laden photos, doesn't mean it is right to circulate the pictures because he is also another human being. Showing the pictures of his death would be wrong not only to our children, but would also be disrespectful to him, no matter how much harm he's done to our country.


Etel

Anonymous said...

Compassion is a feeling of deep sympathy and sorrow for another, accompanied by a strong desire to alleviate the suffering. Exposure of Bin Ladens photos will not alleviate the families of the victims of 911 of their pain and loss.
FH- great Scripture teaching from the book of
knowledge.
-Ana DM

D.Zabala said...

Due to the extensive pain that Bin Laden has caused I could understand why some people would want to see the pictures of his death. On the other hand I don’t think that anything positive would come from seeing the pictures. Even though everyone has a right to compassion this will not alleviate the pain from those who suffered from his wrong doings.

Anonymous said...

Showing Bin Laden's death pictures is complete nonsense. It exposes the innocent and young people to material that caused America pain and suffering. I myself, would not like to see these pictures because Bin Laden caused me emotional pain as well. Starting a war with America sent my Dad and many of my close friends overseas.
I also believe that is shows compassion for those people in the middle east. Showing a person that had superior power dead would most likely devastate some people there and it could cause more problems.

Robert S.

N.Cruz said...

I understand that Bin Laden’s gruesome death photos may not alleviate the pain of the victims from the 9/11 terrorist attacks, but I feel that it will create closure. The pain of the death of a loved one may never heal, but sometimes we need closure in order to move on. Everyone has the right to compassion, but I also feel that a man that caused our country total crisis does not deserve any compassion.

Anonymous said...

I agree with M.Quintanilla, if you don't want to see something don't go looking for it. However I don't agree with the face that those photos are out on the web for any person of any age able to stumble upon. Innocent eyes shouldn't have the opportunity to come across something this uncensored and this gory. Even though this man was such a horrible man, I still feel like he shouldn't be exploited in this way.
SJB

Anonymous said...

I believe that everyone has the right to compassion. This is a feeling that we all have at one point in their life. One feels compassion for some who has lost a child due to an illness or in a car accident. Sometime people help others out of compassion because they can identify themselves with the same problem that person is suffering. Others do it out of love and to aid the pain of the one who is suffering. There was a famous photographer named Kevin Carter who once took a picture of a starving child in Sudan who was walking through the wilderness trying to reach the nearest town. The photo showed a heart-breaking scene of a starving child collapsed to the ground and struggling to get to a food center during a famine in Sudan in 1993. In the background a vulture stalks the emaciated child. The vulture was waiting for the child to die for him to feed on. The price-winning image was taken on March 1, 1993. Later Carter committed suicide because his conscious troubled him. He couldn’t live with himself because he realized that he didn’t have any compassion. What kind of a person would leave a starving child out in the wilderness to be eaten by vultures? The gruesome image of the starving child depicted the lack of compassion of the artist who took the picture. Carter delighted himself in capturing such an image and lost his soul while doing it. One year later after receiving the award, Carter committed suicide. By: L.J.B.R.

Anonymous said...

Many people grieve differently when dealing with pain and suffering. The release of the Bin Laden photos are guaranteed to affect American’s many different ways. Some people might need to see these photos for a sense of closure and others for satisfaction. On the contrary, the government needs to keep in mind to have some compassion towards the Bin Laden family. C.M.A.

Anonymous said...

Exploiting Bin Laden's photographs to the public can bring satisfaction to some but grief to others. Everyone should have the right to compassion in their own personal ways. J.P.

Anonymous said...

Everyone has the right to what they want to see. If someone wants to see the photo so badly to get satisfaction they have the choice to go online and see for themselves. I do not think it was a choice of compassion, I think it goes more towards that some do not want to see it and that kids are always watching t.v. and it can be a little gruesome. G.A.

COL said...

The right to compassion. Do we really know what it is. A perfect opportunity to show compassion would have been for President Obama not to give permission to kill Bin Laden. Compassion does not have to be mutual. Perhaps showing the pictures would have brought relief or closure. Perhaps showing the picture of his corpse would have bough anguish and sadness to Bin Laden's family. So you see to show compassion to one is to NOT show compassion to another. So in the end is it really compassion? I think not. We just have to live and hope that this right works in our favor.

~COL

Anonymous said...

Having compassion is something that we decide to do. I think it depends on our conscience and on what we have been taught over the years either from our parents or people around us. There is no law that states that we are demanded to be compassionate to others and that is why I think that is a legacy that our parents are suppose to put in our hearts. Everyone has the right to compassion. O.V.

Anonymous said...

Not sure why anonymous - a few posts above - dragged Kevin Carter into a discussion about Bin Laden, but just want to point out that his/her post is full of bogus information and is really unfair to the guy - horribly misinformed and judgemental and basically utter bull. The child was at an aid station and there were aid workers and members of her community around. No-one got eaten by vultures, at least not that day. Carter did not commit suicide because he lacked compassion.

Anyway , back on topic – Bin Laden. I don’t feel any need to treat him with respect in death. I can understand why many people would want to verify that he is really dead, given how embarrassing the USA’s failure to capture him was becoming. I don’t personally want to see them but if they are not shoved in our faces on the front of a newspaper or somewhere his family has to see them, it does not bother me if others do, although I’m not generally in favour of showing pictures of dead people unless they serve a clear purpose.